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During this time of social distancing, the Law Office of Marla Zide, LLC is offering both phone and video conferencing options for meetings and consultations. You will be able to contact us via phone during regular business hours to schedule.

Does parallel parenting meet your child’s needs?

On Behalf of | Oct 22, 2021 | child custody

As a divorced or divorcing couple, you need to decide how to continue meeting your child’s needs even after the split. This often serves as a point of contention as you struggle to decide how to do that while also keeping parental arguments to a minimum.

Fortunately, this is where parallel parenting could come in. This option serves your child’s best interest while also helping out you and your co-parent.

Removing the risk of argument exposure

According to Psychology Today, parallel parenting exists as a great way to meet your child’s needs while keeping you and your co-parent from conflict. This is one of the biggest issues parents tend to have with notions of shared custody or co-parenting. For good reason, too; studies show that exposure to parental arguments can actually set back a child’s development and cause issues like elevated rates of depression and anxiety later in life.

You can remove the risk of forcing them to witness arguments through parallel parenting because it removes all forms of in-person contact. Instead of meeting face-to-face or discussing things over the phone, you instead keep all discussions through text or writing. This can include text messages on your phone, emails, or third-party instant messaging applications.

Keeping a notebook record

Some parents also choose to record things in a notebook which they pass back and forward with their child between visits. If you choose to do this, you can write down how visitations went without having to report in person.

If you simply cannot get along with your co-parent, you should consider this option. Speak to legal help if you would like to learn more about it and whether it will suit your needs.