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During this time of social distancing, the Law Office of Marla Zide, LLC is offering both phone and video conferencing options for meetings and consultations. You will be able to contact us via phone during regular business hours to schedule.

Child support basics in Maryland

On Behalf of | Mar 14, 2021 | child support

If you are facing a divorce or separation between someone you have a child with, you may have many questions regarding child support payments.

In Maryland, both parents are responsible for providing support for their children, regardless of their marital status to each other. The following answers some common questions regarding your support payments.

What expenses does child support account for?

A child support order in Maryland covers the following expenses:

  • Work Related Child care costs
  • Health insurance premiums or other related expenses
  • Extraordinary Medical expenses
  • Travel costs for purposes of visitation
  • Potentially, private school tuition

The courts determine the amount of the child support order based on these actual costs and the income of both parents at the time.  Child support is calculated using a calculation that is required if the parent’s gross combined incomes is $15,000 or less.  If the parties have a higher combined gross income, the Court has some discretion.

How long will I have to pay child support?

Maryland requires that  parents pay child support  until either your child  turns 18, as long as they are registered in high school.  If your child is still in high school, your payments will stop once they turn 19, regardless of his or her graduation status.

Can I modify my child support order?

You can request to change your child support order if there has been a change in circumstances.  A change in circumstances may include the emancipation of one child (if you were paying for or receiving support for more than one child) or if either parties’ income has either gone up or gone down.  This is helpful if a parent loses a job, for example, and can no longer pay what he or she once was.

You can always request to modify a child support order due to a change in circumstances, but it is up to the court to make a final determination.