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During this time of social distancing, the Law Office of Marla Zide, LLC is offering both phone and video conferencing options for meetings and consultations. You will be able to contact us via phone during regular business hours to schedule.

How does state law define prescription drug fraud?

| Sep 11, 2020 | drug charges

Some drugs and medicines are not available to the public except by prescription from a doctor. This is to make sure these substances do not end up in the hands of people who would abuse them. To discourage people from obtaining prescription drugs that they should not have, Maryland law criminalizes acquiring prescription drugs through dishonest means.

If you have a legitimate medical problem that a doctor has given you a prescription for, the law should not ensnare you in a charge of prescription drug fraud. By learning how Maryland law defines acquiring prescription drugs through fraud, you might better understand what information you should have so that you do not draw unwarranted suspicion.

Presenting a counterfeit order

If you have a real prescription order from your doctor, you should not have a problem with the law. Fraudsters may present paperwork to a pharmacist that looks authentic but is actually a phony document. Some use an legitimate doctor or prescription order with altered information while others use a completely false prescription order that looks just like the real thing.

Misrepresenting your identity

There are also fraudsters that forego using their real identities while approaching a pharmacist. Instead they supply a false name or a false address in the hopes of gaining prescription drugs. They may even misrepresent themselves as the representative of a party who can acquire prescription medicine like a distributor or a physician.

Concealing material facts

Sometimes it is not what you say but what you do not say that can constitute an act of fraud. Some people try to obtain prescriptions by omitting a key material fact that would otherwise cause a doctor or a pharmacist to deny a prescription. This makes it crucial to maintain all your medical paperwork so you can establish you were fully honest with your doctor and pharmacy about your condition and treatment.