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What happens if commercial drivers are arrested for drunk driving

On Behalf of | Apr 7, 2020 | dui/dwi

Anyone who has a commercial driver’s license (CDL) is held to higher standards than your average passenger car driver. These motorists are required to abide by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) regulations. Included in these rules are special intoxication standards that a CDL holder cannot violate. If they do, then they run the risk of losing their ability to remain commercial drivers.

Individuals who drive tanker trucks, church vans, school buses, and government vehicles may be required to hold CDL licenses.

This may shed some light on why the regulations that these motorists are subject to are pretty strict. A bus driver could be carrying dozens of young kids in their vehicle. A tanker truck driver could be hauling potentially flammable gases or other chemicals. If there were some type of accident, then someone could get seriously hurt.

FMCSA has policies in place in terms of what they consider to be an illegal blood alcohol concentration (BAC) for commercial drivers. That percentage is 0.04%, half the legal limit that is set for non-commercial motorists in most states.

Federal regulations make it illegal for any person who holds a CDL to consume alcohol in the four hours before they get behind the wheel of a commercial vehicle. Federal law allows for commercial drivers to be randomly tested for the presence of both drugs and alcohol in their system and anytime reasonable suspicion exists.

CDL-holders generally are subject to losing their licenses for longer than most other non-commercial drivers if they’re charged and convicted of a drunk driving offense in Maryland. FMCSA regulations also require such drivers to report any such traffic violations to their employer within 30 days of an incident. Employers can also lawfully let a worker go from their job if they’re convicted on driving while intoxicated (DWI) charges.

If you rely on your commercial driving job to pay your bills and you’re convicted of a drunk driving offense, then your ability to make ends meet may be put in great jeopardy. A DUI/DWI defense attorney can advise you of any steps that you may be able to take in your Glen Burnie case to minimize the chances of this happening.